Exhibitions / Notices

SUBMIT View

Current notices

There are no notices at this time.

Today's notices

  • National Oil and Acrylic Painters Society 2020 Spring Online International Exhibition

    Location: , ON

    The National Oil & Acrylic Painters’ Society (NOAPS) invites oil and acrylic painters..
    View notice

  • Land and Sky - 2 Artist/2 Perspectives

    Location: Windsor, ON

    PAINTING WORKSHOP AT SHO ART STUDIOS APRIL 3rd 4th and 5th 2020..
    View notice

  • Confluent Dreams

    Location: North Battleford, SK

    An afternoon exhibition, cranky theatre and musical performance all taking place at..
    View notice

  • Love At First Sight

    Location: Regina, SK

    Love At First Sight / Regina Art Collective members: Dave Gedjos / DeLee Grant..
    View notice

  • In Other Words

    Location: Regina, SK

    In Other Words / Regina Art Collective members: Nikki Jacquin / Derek Olson / Mark..
    View notice

  • Alee & Ayla: Approaches to Portraiture

    Location: Regina, SK

    H.J. Linnen; Patron of the Regina Art Collective will be exhibiting works from his..
    View notice

  • Call for Art - 4th Annual Black & White Art Competition

    Location: Palm Springs, CA

    Fusion Art invites submissions for the 4th Annual Black & White online art..
    View notice

  • CALL FOR ARTISTS: VENICE INTERNATIONAL ART FAIR 2020

    Location: Venice,

    CALL FOR ARTISTS: VENICE INTERNATIONAL ART FAIR 2020 Venice | April 09 – May..
    View notice

  • CALL FOR ARTISTS: THE EXTENDED BODY 2020

    Location: London,

    CALL FOR ARTISTS: THE EXTENDED BODY – MIXING CULTURES ITSLIQUID International Art Exhibition THE..
    View notice

  • Call for Proposals: 2020 The WALL Artist

    Location: Vancouver, BC

    Vancouver Heritage Foundation is now accepting proposals from independent artists and curators for..
    View notice

  • 10th Annual

    Location: Palm Springs, CA

    Light Space & Time Online Art Gallery announces an art call for the..
    View notice

  • Appreciation of the Arts

    Location: London, ON

    Three day art and music event to recognize local artists in London, Ontario...
    View notice

  • Call to Artists - 2020 Sooke Fine Arts Show

    Location: Sooke, BC

    Artists are invited to submit work for consideration to the 2020 Sooke Fine..
    View notice

  • INK by Shawn Zheng

    Location: Saskatoon, SK

    Shu Cheng (Shawn) Zheng features his distinctive style of making marks in Chinese..
    View notice

  • North Shore Art Crawl

    Location: North Shore, BC

    The North Shore Art Crawl is a free community arts event March 7+8,..
    View notice

  • New Craft Coalition: Call to Artists

    Location: Calgary, AB

    New Craft Coalition invites applications from all mid-career and professional artists to be..
    View notice

  • TRAVEL EXHIBITION

    Location: Toronto, ON

    John Mantha will be participating in a group show at Twist Gallery in..
    View notice

  • David Tycho: Urbania

    Location: Vancouver, BC

    Guest artist David Tycho will exhibit 10 paintings from his latest series. This series..
    View notice

  • ACAF (Accessible Art Fair) 2020

    Location: Brussels,

    ACAF (Accessible Art Fair) is back on October 15-18, 2020 for its 14th..
    View notice

  • Clarkson Society of Artists 2020 Show & Sale

    Location: Mississauga, ON

    The Clarkson Society of Artists invites you to attend their annual show &..
    View notice

  • Call for Artists: Urban Matrix

    Location: North Vancouver, BC

    North Van Arts is inviting artists to take part in an upcoming group..
    View notice

  • 9th Artist Spotlight Solo Art Competition

    Location: Palm Springs, CA

    Fusion Art is now accepting entries for the 9th Artist Spotlight Solo Art..
    View notice

  • Call For Artists: The Other Art Fair Toronto

    Location: Toronto, ON

    The Other Art Fair are thrilled to present the newest edition of The..
    View notice

  • Call for Art - 4th Annual Colors Art Competition

    Location: Palm Springs, CA

    Fusion Art invites submissions for the 4th Annual Colors online art competition. For this..
    View notice

  • Marlene Kawalez and Corynn Kokolakis

    Location: Toronto, ON

    Presented by: Cedar Ridge Gallery. Part of the Cedar Ridge Gallery Contemporary Exhibition series. March..
    View notice

  • Jane Selbie and Joseph Farrugia

    Location: Toronto, ON

    Presented by: Cedar Ridge Gallery. Part of the Cedar Ridge Gallery Contemporary Exhibition series. February..
    View notice

  • “Grey” International Call - Art & Literature Journal - Deadline February 28, 2020

    Location: Toronto, ON

    | Theme: Grey surrounds us, sometimes in surprising ways. In beach pebbles, a..
    View notice

  • on thin ice Polar Bear Art Exhibit

    Location: Toronto, ON

    On thin ice is a solo exhibit of polar bear portrait paintings by..
    View notice

  • Support the Worldwide Art Community | Participate in 6x6x2020

    Location: Rochester, ON

    Hello Artists in Canada, We want YOU to participate in 6x6x2020! Let your creative..
    View notice

  • Olivier Du Tre: New Works

    Location: CALGARY, AB

    January 7 to February 29, 2020 At HUB@302 302-1235 26 Ave SE, Calgary, AB..
    View notice

  • WAAH 124th Juried Exhibition at the Art Gallery of Hamilton

    Location: Hamilton, ON

    Who:  The Women’s Art Association of Hamilton (WAAH) at the Art Gallery of..
    View notice

  • The Indian Contemporary Art Competition

    Location: New York, NY, ON

    The Indian Contemporary Art Competition (ICAC) aims to discover and promote talented artists..
    View notice

  • The Loft On King Street

    Location: Toronto, ON

    The Loft On King Street is one of the most unique private event..
    View notice

VIEW ADVERTISING

Robert Bateman - Part 1 of 2

By Robert Amos June 17, 2004

} Robert Bateman - Part 1 of 2 By Robert Amos ArtSpring, Salt Spring Island’s centre for the performing and visual arts, is host to a preview exhibition by Robert Bateman. Bateman lives on Saltspring and is presenting 40 of his original works there, from June 4 to 20, 2004. For information try www.artspring.ca or call (250) 537-2102 1-866-537-2102 (toll-free) 100 Jackson Ave., Salt Spring Island, B.C. V8K 2V8 Bateman There was no mistaking him. With sandy hair and piercing blue eyes, he looked much younger than his 74 years. On an overcast Saltspring Island morning, he met me outside his studio door with hand extended: “Bob Bateman,” he said by way of introduction. We swept past the garden glade and into the hive of activity which is his studio. Bateman was not alone. Alex Fischer, the self-described “dragon at the gate”, controlled the nerve centre; Kate Carson’s desk in the corner was business-like; Birgit Bateman, Robert’s wife, hovered over a series of her colour photos, some of which were recently published by National Geographic as illustrations to Peter Matthiessen’s book on Antarctica. Clearly, the world of Robert Bateman is a group undertaking. A high-school teacher until the age of 46, Bateman could hardly restrain his instinct to show and tell. I’d come to see his paintings - virtually everything he’s done in the past three years -which are now on show at ArtSpring on Saltspring Island. Bateman’s last show was at the Peninsula Gallery in Sidney in 2001. That was a preview of work destined for a gallery Johannesberg, South Africa. The paintings displayed on Saltspring Island will shortly be seen at Gerald Peters Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico Bateman set out an easel under the skylight, placed a settee near by, and the paintings were stacked in order of size close at hand. “We’ll start with the smallest,” he began, and slipped a masonite panel onto the easel. It was a picture of a wee mouse slipping down a branch, a design that clearly owed something to Japanese art. Bateman is a practiced showman, and he after some comments, tossed the first painting casually onto the floor beside him. It was replaced by a slightly larger one, a grey fox, rim-lit, seen against a grey stone canyon wall. Bateman is the leading wildlife artist in the world. Because of his fame and success, there is a tendency to judge his work and his opinions with unrelenting criticism. It’s likely he has become a wealthy man from the proceeds of the sale of prints of his work. And he uses the attention his paintings attract to create a platform for his articulate and unrelenting views about conservation of the natural world. These are all contentious issues, but I confess that, after two hours in his studio, his skills, his philosophy and his personality disarmed me completely. I found him a hard-working painter creating pictures that mean a lot to him. He works in the only style he can. What’s not to like? While my thoughts wandered, Bateman was at the easel, running his hands over one of his paintings. He was talking about “happy accidents”, and heaping praise on Hornby Island artist David Barker. He noted Barker’s photographic memory and his boat-building skills, but what he really envied is the way Barker “lets physics and chemistry do the work”. Bateman knows that a controlling and detailed expression is not all there is to painting. Barker and Bateman are part of the Artists for Nature Foundation, an international group inspired on the Carmannah project which did so much to save our first-growth forest some years ago. The attention a group of painters can bring to a threatened region is surprisingly effective. Next Bateman put on the easel a view of his father’s woodpile at the family cottage on Boshkung Lake in Ontario. I mentioned that he integrates animals into their context so well that we must become deeply engaged in each picture, searching for the subject. “I don’t want to go Where’s Waldo,” he confessed. I confess, I had been gazing at the image of the woodpile for at least 30 seconds before I spied an ermine in the centre foreground! I spotted the ermine, but realized that there was much more. Bateman’s father’s footsteps in the snow, and the way the old man tucked spare bits of lumber up under the roof... “He was a real putterer-about”, Bateman recalled fondly. That way of hiding subject within context is the way Bateman writes. He recently proposed a book of overtly political paintings to his publisher. The text he offered was, he told me, “just ranting - being a teacher”. The publisher counseled him to calm down and just tell stories. Good advice, I’d say, but inevitably there will be a passionate conservation message tucked inside the engaging anecdote. Another panel appeared on the easel - a blue thrush posed against an ancient adobe wall. Bateman took delight in revealing his methods. “That bird wasn’t there,” he noted, “and the wall wasn’t blue.” In fact, it was a thrush of a different species which he brought out of his freezer to model for the subject. And as to photographs, he’s not coy. “I use from 5 to 50 photographs on the average painting,” he explained. There are many who disparage the “photo realism” of which he is a master. But that’s not what makes his art so effective. “The essence of art is a sense of mystery,” he offered, quoting Hermann Hesse. “Colville knows that,” he continued, and went on to describe his favourite of Alex Colville’s early works, a picture of a horse running along a railway track toward a locomotive. Then he told me the tale of his most famous painting. It’s a black wolf on a black background. When he sent it to the publisher of his prints, Mill Pond Press in Florida, they sent it back. “The eyes have no pupils,” they pointed out. “And it’s too dark - nobody likes darkness”. Their biology expert commented that “the legs are too long”. Bateman returned it without change. Eventually they printed it, to everlasting acclaim. And those eyes? Bateman recalled that they inspired by Disney’s Fantasia. The monster in the Night on Bald Mountain sequence of that film has no pupils in his glowing green eyes. By now the pile of paintings he had tossed in a pile on the floor beside me must have been worth a million dollars. But to the man who made them they were rough and ready and sufficiently durable. The muted hues of the next picture before us represented cow-paths, zig-zags in frozen grass beside a split rail fence. As we examined it. Bateman scraped away at the surface with his fingernail, trying to dislodge a bit of paint that seemed to stand out a bit. Painterly mishaps happen sometimes, to someone who invests so much time creating a believable sense of texture. He showed me a “grungy” paint roller he uses. “Don’t wash it - leave the acrylic in it,” Bateman advised. “ Then roll it and twist it and smear it.” He darted off to grab a chunk of distressed sponge and proceeded to dab away at a one of the pictures, to demonstrate “the B. S. M.” - the Bateman Sponge Method. Like many an artist, he’s rather attached to the early stages of his work. Bateman often “starts in, hoping I can leave it alone. I’d like to do a whole show of big abstract paintings that look like my paintings when they are just half-done.” Yet he can’t seem to hold back. “I go back in, “ he sighed, “like trimming a hedge - or a moustache.” Despite what his critics say, his paintings are not simply about verisimilitude. And they aren’t only about mystery. He has a message. “I want to give reasons to celebrate,” he told me. “Why should we care about the natural world? That’s what I’m trying to show. In a trite way I want to show how beautiful and varied the world is.” Take his work as a whole and you’ll see his is not simply a saccharine sentiment. “In my letters and writing I show the dark side,” he insisted. (You can find this ‘dark side’ for yourself at www.batemanideas.com). In this remarkable balancing act between love and anger, the power of one side gives force to the other. Next on view was a painting of a big cat on the margins of a swamp fire among the Florida palm trees. Most of the picture was smoky, and the artist expatiated on his love for middle tones. Black and white almost never occur in a Bateman painting. “The secret to my work is tiny adjustments in tone,” he noted. So that’s his secret! As if to demonstrate the fact, next he showed me a canvas one metre square. “You perhaps know of my love for Mark Rothko’s paintings,” he murmured. The top two thirds were painted a rich charcoal grey, and a black bear loomed out of the darkness. Nothing in this dark painting even approaches a true black. The bear’s eyes, ears and nose - “black” in nature - were a mid-tone, like the rest of the picture. The darkness was implied by those “tiny adjustments in tone.” www.robertbateman.ca www.batemanideas.com www.artspring.ca www.robertbateman.ca/bfb/bfb.html ___________________________________________ Copyright © 2004Robert Amos Robert Amos is an artist and art writer who lives in Victoria, B.C.. He can be contacted by e-mail and you can view his paintings at www.robertamos.com